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OPEN STUDIOS


Past Exhibitions 2018

Past Exhibitions 2017

Past Exhibitions 2016

 

 

Past Exhibitions   2017

APT SHOTS 2017 : Passionate Process curated by Sheila Vollmer

Exhibiting Artists: Anthony Carr, Barbara Caruso, Charles Hewlings, Jane Joseph,
Gina Medcalf, Joanna Sands, Michael Shaw and poet Nelson Ball.

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Ex Roma IV | Abbey Awards

23 February to 5 March 2017
Incorporated Edwin Austin Abbey Memorial Scholarships (Abbey Awards) – Scholarships and Fellowships

2012 | Katy Kirbach | Jonathan Baldock | Amir Chasson | Stuart Cumberland
2013 | Daniele Genadry | Cathy Lomax | Andrea Medjesi-Jones | Marius von Brasch
2014 | Nancy Milner | Gina Medcalf | Gill Ord | Daniel Sinsel
2015 | Ross Taylor | Anne Ryan | David Ryan | Catherine Story

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New Material
Living in a New Material World

Artist-Curator | Tyler Mallison

10 March to 2 April 2017, open Thursday to Sunday from 12noon to 5pm
SLAM Last Fridays | Friday 31 March from 6pm to 8pm

Robert Cervera (ES), Russell Chater (UK), Marieke Gelissen (NL), Paul Kindersley (UK), 
Edith Kollath (DE), Tyler Mallison (US, UK), Nika Neelova (RU), Michaela Zimmer (DE)

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The Habit of Hiding Behind Things

Chris Alton | Svenja Buhl | Jack Otway

Thursday 20 April to Sunday 23 April 2017

To hide is to prevent something from being seen, and therefore known. There is power in that which is rendered unseeable and/or unknowable. The act of hiding can disrupt or redistribute power, as can the exposure of the hidden. Art frequently involves an excavation of the hidden, unseen or masked, which can catalyse a shift in perception. It uncovers the hidden in the everyday; decoding, digging and drawing attention to neglected visual orders.

The Habit of Hiding Behind Things brings together new and recent work by the A.P.T Graduate Studio Award 2016 winners; Chris Alton, Svenja Bühl and Jack Otway. The exhibition comes at the end of their year-long residency at A.P.T Studios and includes an array of works that span; painting, sculpture, video, performance, design and writing.

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SLAB brings together new work by

Eva Gold
Sarah Jenkins
Lilian Nejatpour
Jenn Pavlick

Sunday 9 April at 3pm | Katrina Palmer’s End Matter: A Reading Group
Join us for a discussion of Katrina Palmer’s End Matter. We will discuss the themes of the book in connection with art practice, making, sculpture, language and everyday life. This will be an open exploration of the text with particular emphasis on materiality and Palmer's use of language as a sculptural medium. However, any other discussions that people want to bring to the table are welcome!

About End Matter: The Isle of Portland off the south coast of England has been shaped and hollowed out over centuries by convicts and quarrymen to provide stone for some of London's best-known buildings. A sculptural excavation of this elemental island, marked by unsettling absences, and a writer who has gone missing, generated a series of narratives for listeners, readers and walkers.

All are welcome to join and participate in this informal reading group discussion led by Eva Gold, Sarah Jenkins, Lilian Nejatpour and Jennifer Pavlick.

For those who don’t have access to the text, the audio is available here;
https://www.artangel.org.uk/project/end-matter/

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CREEKSIDE OPEN 2017 selected by Alison Wilding
8 June to 2 July 2017  |  Exhibition open Thursday to Sunday from 12noon to 5pm

Conversation with Art  | Susan Sluglett and Victoria Rance | Friday 30 June from 5.30pm to 6.16pm
June Late Last Fridays  |  Friday 30 June from 6pm to 7pm

SELECTED ARTISTS  |  Kristaps Ancans  |  Annie Attridge  |  Alex Baker  |  Marta Bakst  |  Susan Berry  |  Rob Birch  |  Holly Birtles  |  Ryan Brown  |  Rebecca Byrne  |  Yunling Chen  |  Hannah Clarkson  |  Fiona Curran  |  Nikki Davidson-Bowman  |  Sarah Davies  |  Daniel Davis  |  Tori Day  |  Rodney Dee  |  fiona finnegan  |  Charlie Franklin  |  Jonathan Gabb  |  Emily Glass  |  Caroline Gorick  |  Laura Green  |  Athene Greig  |  Tom Hackney  |  Nicky Hodge  |  Bruce Ingram  |  Egle Jauncems  |  Sarah Jenkins  |  Li Yin Juang  |  Agnieszka Katz Barlow  |  Sarah Kogan  |  Sandy Layton  |  Maggie Learmonth  |  James Lomax  |  Dennis Low  |  Wayne Lucas  |  Sarah Macdonald  |  Rowan Mace  |  Selma Makela  |  Enzo Marra  |  Sophie Marritt  |  Ben McDonnell  |  Jane Millar  |  Paul David Mitchell  |  Anna Mortimer  |  Tahmina Negmat  |  Doireann Ni Ghrioghair  |  Sarah Pager  |  Joshua Philpott  |  Marion Piper  |  Angus Sanders-Dunnachie  |  Miho Sato  |  Laura Jane Scott  |  Cecilia Sjoholm  |  Susan Sluglett  |  Laura Smith  |  Liam Sprod  |  Tabitha Steinberg  |  Amy Stephens  |  Bill Stewart  |  Gloria Sulli  |  Isobel Mei Taylor  |  Stephan Termote  |  Julie Umerle  |  Ronis Varlaam  |  Rachel Warriner  |  Poppy Whatmore  |  Corey Whyte

 creeksideopen.org  

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CREEKSIDE OPEN 2017 selected by Alison Wilding

8 June to 2 July 2017  |  Exhibition open Thursday to Sunday from 12noon to 5pm

Conversation with Art  | Susan Sluglett and Victoria Rance | Friday 30 June from 5.30pm to 6.16pm
June Late Last Fridays  |  Friday 30 June from 6pm to 7pm

SELECTED ARTISTS  |  Kristaps Ancans  |  Annie Attridge  |  Alex Baker  |  Marta Bakst  |  Susan Berry  |  Rob Birch  |  Holly Birtles  |  Ryan Brown  |  Rebecca Byrne  |  Yunling Chen  |  Hannah Clarkson  |  Fiona Curran  |  Nikki Davidson-Bowman  |  Sarah Davies  |  Daniel Davis  |  Tori Day  |  Rodney Dee  |  fiona finnegan  |  Charlie Franklin  |  Jonathan Gabb  |  Emily Glass  |  Caroline Gorick  |  Laura Green  |  Athene Greig  |  Tom Hackney  |  Nicky Hodge  |  Bruce Ingram  |  Egle Jauncems  |  Sarah Jenkins  |  Li Yin Juang  |  Agnieszka Katz Barlow  |  Sarah Kogan  |  Sandy Layton  |  Maggie Learmonth  |  James Lomax  |  Dennis Low  |  Wayne Lucas  |  Sarah Macdonald  |  Rowan Mace  |  Selma Makela  |  Enzo Marra  |  Sophie Marritt  |  Ben McDonnell  |  Jane Millar  |  Paul David Mitchell  |  Anna Mortimer  |  Tahmina Negmat  |  Doireann Ni Ghrioghair  |  Sarah Pager  |  Joshua Philpott  |  Marion Piper  |  Angus Sanders-Dunnachie  |  Miho Sato  |  Laura Jane Scott  |  Cecilia Sjoholm  |  Susan Sluglett  |  Laura Smith  |  Liam Sprod  |  Tabitha Steinberg  |  Amy Stephens  |  Bill Stewart  |  Gloria Sulli  |  Isobel Mei Taylor  |  Stephan Termote  |  Julie Umerle  |  Ronis Varlaam  |  Rachel Warriner  |  Poppy Whatmore  |  Corey Whyte

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Touchstone

14 September to 8 October 2017

Open Thursday to Sunday from 12noon to 5pm

A group show of work by A.P.T artist-members curated by the recipients of A.P.T’s 2017/18 Graduate Studio Award : David Bloor, Lulu Cottell and Katya Lewis

Alix MacSweeney  |  Anthony Daley  |  Arnold Dobbs  |  Brigitte Parusel  |  Catherine Ferguson  |  Chris Marshall  |  Clyde Hopkins  |  David Bloor  |  David Oates  |  David Webb  |  Dexter Dymoke  |  Ekkehard Altenburger  |  Fran Cottell  |  Geoff Mowlam  |  Heather Burrell  |  Hideatsu Shiba  |  Jeff Dellow  |  Jodie Carey  |  John McLean  |  Katya Lewis  |  Laurence Noga  |  Linda Aloysius  |  Liz Harrison  |  Lou Smith  |  Lulu Cottell  |  Mali Morris  |  Marcus Cope  |  Margaret Higginson  |  Marilyn Hallam  |  Nic Godbold  |  Nicola Rae  |  Paul Malone  |  Paul Tonkin  |  Rachel Russell  |  Richard Lawrence  |  Rob Welch  |  Sheila Vollmer   |  Stephen Jaques  |  Stephen Lewis  |  Tim Cousins  |  Veronique Chance  |  Victoria Rance   

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Charting the Invisible
Urban Photographers’ Association (UPA)

10 – 15 November 2017

The organisers of the 2017 International UrbanPhotoFest (UPF) are delighted to present Charting the Invisible, the annual collective show of the Urban Photographers’ Association (UPA). The exhibition shows the collaborative work of 22 UPA members responding to the festival theme of Cartographies.

Maps work on the thin boundary between science and art, between rational representation of spatial data and the evocation of the hidden and emotional layers that compose the reality as we experience it. The inner meaning of a bi-dimensional map resides in what is left out of the physical frame, in those evocative elements that conveys a full perception of the territory considered and represented.

Cartographies are not only a combination of paper and ink or digital data; their meaning resides in those hidden intangible layers that allow a full comprehension of the charted territory. In a similar way a photographic frame works as a self-contained limit whose meaning stands in what remains out of it. The omitted, and its evocative meaning, becomes the significance of the image. Charting the Invisible aims to break the boundary of what we traditionally consider the cartographic interpretation of reality. The representation of those hidden layers - emotional, intangible and evocative – becomes the focus of the works shown in the exhibition.

Exhibiting Artists | Kamal Badhey, Stefano Carnelli, Peter Coles, Andy Day, Diego Ferrari, Lauren Finch, Lene Hald, Paul Halliday, Sayed Hasan, Tanya Houghton, Nai Wen Hsu, Rachel Jones, David Kendall, Rebecca Locke, Bas Losekoot, Luc Pauwels, Vrinda Seksaria, Konstantin Sergeyev, Yanina Shevchenko, Manuel Vázquez, Gesche Würfel, Kyler Zeleny

Exhibition Curators | Tanya Houghton and Stefano Carnelli

In conjunction with the exhibition a book exploring cartographies, edited and designed by David Kendall, Tanya Houghton and Stefano Carnelli will be published by the Urban Photographers’ Association.

APT Gallery, 6 Creekside, London SE8 4SA (www.aptstudios.org/gallery/)
Opening hours: Monday – Sunday - 12:00 - 17:00

Private view: Saturday, 11 November 2017, 18:00 - 20:00, free - all welcome

UPA portfolio review: Tuesday 14 November 2017, 10:00 - 12:00 (portfolio review - booking: www.urbanphotofest.org)


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LET SLIP
Ben Urban  | Eilidh Watson  | Izzy Dubois  | Rachel Irons
 
17 to 19 November 2017  |  Gallery open from 12noon to 5pm

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ANDERS RINDOM

Two large-scale projects and a modest, time-based piece will be shown at A.P.T Gallery


23 November to 17 December 2017

Performance | On Saturday 25 November 2017 at 3pm the double bass player Henrik Jensen will be visiting the exhibition. He will perform songs that are associated with or directly referenced in Anders Rindom’s two large- scale projects. In addition he will accompany him as he constructs a small time-based work. Refreshments will be served.

Forårs Fabrikken
This is a twelve-part sculpture, a landscape in which spectators are invited to stroll around and engage with the exhibits by touch and observation, to experience the empty spaces between the pieces as if something very solid and concrete. It is a choreographed walk that is for certain: a narrative about a leisurely stroll spun and stretched out in the confines of an exhibition space. The title of the piece is best translated as 'A light industrial unit capable of generating or producing the sensation of springtime'. That is not terribly snappy, so I have decided to keep the original title, which is Danish and came to me early on, while still working on the Marquette’s.

The many parts were nearly all produced during a long stay in Copenhagen earlier this year on a residency at the Danish Arts Workshop, where I had access to a state of the art wood workshop. But given all the opportunities it offered, with all these amazing pieces of equipment at my disposal, I had within a few days set my eyes on a heavy, cast iron scroll saw that had been relegated to a dusty corner. More or less all the work that makes up  ‘Forårs Fabrikken’ was in the end done using this one, simple piece of engineering.

Although the piece originally was conceived solely as a work in birch ply, two further avenues of investigation turned up as I started to translate my ideas into solid form: a memory of 19th century plant containers, made from simple, planed wood and lined with zinc on the inside, allowing frost sensitive plants to be moved indoors at wintertime. These recollections lead me to add an identical cladding on the internal parts of two of the largest pieces. Furthermore, an urge to define a soft core, a center to the piece that starts off the walk and a quiet, restful point to round it off soon followed. This I achieved by making a number of padded, linen cushions for two other pieces.

Working in birch wood, in a city where I have not lived for half a lifetime brought a number of ghosts back into my life, practitioners from the past, who's mindset I had to circumnavigate in order to arrive at the port I had intended: a space in which objects are not the center of all attention, rather are servants to the moods and fleeting whims of visitors: Generous and playful with an openness to a multitude of readings: something that may put a spring in your step, change your behavior and in that simple way alter your outlook, the way you think. To me, that is what sums up the beauty of springtime.

Over sø og land
This piece has a title, also in Danish, which I have lifted from the opening of a traditional song, written with small children in mind. It starts with the line:
‘I traveled across both lakes and fields and there I met a very old man. He asked me: where did I come from and where did I belong?’

The song is very simple, yet full of possibilities for improvisation and designed to address the old man’s question. Its aim is to engage, to make children join in. But it also allows every one of them, for a brief moment to stand out: If he or she chooses an activity and can persuade the others to take part, then that chosen pursuit would be where they all belong. So the answer to the old man’s question could therefore be: the country where you clap your hands, jump up and down or whistle on a single note.

My piece, which is an open-ended collection of paintings, objects and photographs, is also about belonging. Its concept came to me as I was quietly working, crafting pieces in my small workshop in East London. The pieces deal with daily activities, the chores and simple joys generated by mundane and repetitive tasks and the complex, sensual pleasures I associate with the nature of art. Together these two separate strands of life manage to focus me, serve as my generator. They energize and invite me to tap into and explore the particular area of London where I work and have come to consider part of home. This is a place where little is homegrown, where each and every ingredient comes from somewhere else and all is in transit. This is a world of gentle friction and subtle exchanges, the current of another kind of authenticity.

My pieces sit between many cultures and speak in many languages. There are residues of Scandinavian domestic life, memories of which I brought with me somewhere amongst my belongings when I arrived in the U.K. many years ago, observations made daily at the little slice of Turkey hidden within Dalston where
I work and the firm grip of a Greater London that envelops and contains me. They mimic high culture, but depend on life's lower tiers for water and nourishment. I have learned to adapt and to treasure all that goes into the fluent identity of my present patch. It has quietly song itself into a place where I belong.

When I woke up one morning just over a year ago to learn that I, with millions of other EU citizens no longer belonged in Britain nor were particularly needed I felt bewildered and angry. We had been downsized, reduced to the size of a bargaining chip in a new magnolia colored, dream-free reconstruction of a place I care for. I hope the many parts, that goes into this piece acknowledges the inherent values in cross-fertilization, the wonderful dialogue there is to be had between many cultures living together and celebrates the amazing conversations I have the opportunity to have.

En juleleg
‘En juleleg’ is a modest one-off piece, a time-based work that will generate a small open construction. It will be made of little handmade figurines painted in pastel colors, found plastic fragments, new clear plastic cups and carbonated water and will celebrate tradition and the culmination of a season. Although the tittle innocently translates as ‘A Christmas game’, the word in Danish caries undertones of mischief, even inappropriate behavoir. A musical score by the double bass player Henrik Jensen will accompany the assembly of this work and use quotes from both traditional Danish songs and American jazz standards.

Henrik Jensen henrik-jensen.com

This exhibition was made possible thanks to generous support from:
Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fondt and Statens Vaerksteder for Kunst (The Danish Arts
workshop) 

Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fondt 
The Danish Arts Workshop/ Statens Værksteder for Kunst

 ‘Foraars Fabrikken’, article  http://svfk.dk/project/foraars-fabrikken

 Anders Rindom
www.paintedwithsound.com  and  www.andersrindom.com

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